DCM – What you should know…

amanda Uncategorized

The scare of your pet getting DCM (dilated cardiomyopathy) has been everywhere. It has been in the headlines, the news, and probably all over your social media feed and has been causing quite the panic for many pet parents. We love our pets, so naturally when a headline comes out saying our pets could get a possible deadly disease, we tend to panic a little.

Many are just posting the headlines and not the actual facts of the study – or picking out points to pursue their agenda. Here’s what we do know- Since 2014, about 560 dogs have developed DCM out of 77 million dogs in the United States. That means that there is a 0.000007% chance of your dog developing DCM. Out of those 560 dogs, many are dogs that are genetically prone to DCM and therefore should not have been included in the study. While we understand that more research needs to be done, no one has proven that diet has anything to do with pets developing DCM. In fact, your dog is more likely to get diabetes, cancer, kidney failure, or experience dangerous side effects from flea & tick medication.

The FDA just came out with an updated question & answer section on DCM. Question 17 from the link is this:

What’s the safest diet for my dog?
“Different dogs have different nutritional needs based on a number of factors, so nutrition advice is not one-size-fits-all. The FDA recommends asking your veterinarian, who may consult a board-certified or veterinary nutritionist, for advice about what to feed your dog.

It’s important to note that the reports include dogs that have eaten grain-free and grain containing foods and also include vegetarian or vegan formulations. They also include all forms of diets: kibble, canned, raw and home-cooked. Therefore, we do not think these cases can be explained simply by whether or not they contain grains, or by brand or manufacturer.

To put this issue into proper context, the American Veterinary Medical Association estimates that there are 77 million pet dogs in the United States. As of April 30, 2019, the FDA has received reports about 560 dogs diagnosed with DCM suspected to be linked to diet. Tens of millions of dogs have been eating dog food without developing DCM. If you are concerned about the diet you are currently feeding your dog, FDA recommends working with your veterinarian, who may consult a board-certified veterinary nutritionist, to determine the best diet for your dog’s need.

It’s important to note that the reports include dogs that have eaten grain-free and grain containing foods and also include vegetarian or vegan formulations. They also include all forms of diets: kibble, canned, raw and home-cooked. Therefore, we do not think these cases can be explained simply by whether or not they contain grains, or by brand or manufacturer.

We at The Nautical Dog are here to help and answer any questions that you may have. We offer many different types of food for your pet and will help you determine what is best for your pet.